These are all of the Law Enforcement and Corrections bills proposed in the 2019 session. Each bill has its own bill number, please use your browser search feature to find the bill you are interested in. Return to the Colorado home page to pick a different bill category.

None of the text is the opinion of Engage. Each bill's description, arguments for, and arguments against are our best effort at describing what each bill does, arguments for, and arguments against the bill. The long description is hidden by design, you can click on it to expand it if you want to read more detail about the bill.  If you believe we are missing something, please contact us with your suggestion. Some of these bills have the notation that they have been sent to the chamber's "kill" committee. This means that the leadership has decided to send the bill to the State committee even though it does not belong there based on its subject matter. This committee, in both chambers, is stacked with members from "safe" districts and the idea is to kill the bill without forcing any less safe members to take a hard vote. It is possible for a bill to survive the kill committee, but it is very rare.

Prime sponsors are given after each bill, with Senate sponsors in () and House sponsors in []. They are color-coded by party.

Each bill has been given a "magnitude" category: Major, Medium, Minor, and Technical. This is a combination of the change the bill would create and the "controversy" level of the bill. Some minor bills that are extending current programs would be major changes if they were introducing something new, but the entire goal here is to allow you to better curate your time. Something uncontroversial likely to pass nearly unanimously that continues a past program may not be worth your time (and please remember, you can still read all of the minor bills!). Technical bills are here to round out the list. They are non-substantive changes.

House

Click on the House bill title to jump to its section:

MAJOR

MEDIUM

MINOR

HB19-1073: Law Enforcement Information Sharing Grant Program
HB19-1080 Benefits for First Responders with a Disability

Senate

Click on the Senate bill title to jump to its section:

MAJOR

MEDIUM

MINOR

HB19-1073 Law Enforcement Information Sharing Grant Program (Fields) [Benavidez]

Short Description:

Creates a grant program to assist local law enforcement agencies in gaining access to the Colorado Information Sharing Consortium (CISC). Uses $1.9 from the marijuana tax cash fund to fund the program.

Long Description:

Creates a grant program to assist local law enforcement agencies in gaining access to the Colorado Information Sharing Consortium (CISC). Grants are one-time and can be used for to pay for computer hardware, software, and programming costs necessary to connect to the CISC. Uses $1.9 from the marijuana tax cash fund to fund the program. The CISC, created in 2014 and now consisting of 68 of the 333 eligible agencies, acts as a facilitator between state law enforcement agencies, proving for secure and efficient data sharing. CISC complies with federal data security requirements and the information shared complies with federal regulations.


Arguments For:

Law enforcement personnel interact daily with a wide variety of people, from law-abiding citizens to frequent offenders to individuals suffering from mental health challenges, sometimes without complete or adequate information to determine who presents a risk, who does not present a risk, and who needs mental health services. It is safe and secure. And this isn’t like Facebook sharing your personal data, it’s only stuff that is relevant to law enforcement. The more law enforcement agencies that participate in CISC, the better benefits to the entire state. Getting rural and cash strapped agencies into the program is what this bill will do.

Arguments Against:

We should not create a giant big brother database of Colorado’s citizens. While this does pose an obstacle for law enforcement, it is more imperative to protect the privacy of our citizens. This bill is going in the opposite direction of where we should be headed, which is to disband CISC altogether.

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB19-1073

HB19-1080 Benefits for First Responders with a Disability [Bockenfeld]

Short Description:

Grants retired first responders with an occupational disability free lifetime small game hunting and fishing licenses and a free columbine pass for entrance into state parks. Also allows them to participate in a property tax work-off program, which usually requires reaching the age of 60.

Long Description: n/a

Arguments For:

The least we can do for first responders who have given their health for all of us is to provide them free access to the peace and beauty of our state, including hunting and fishing which so many of them enjoy. It also makes sense to allow them early access to the property tax work-off which is designed for people with disabilities.

Arguments Against: 

While we obviously appreciate all our first responders do, this is too generous: free hunting and fishing and access to state parks for life.

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB19-1080