These are all of the Housing bills proposed in the 2019 session. Each bill has its own bill number, please use your browser search feature to find the bill you are interested in. Return to the Colorado home page to pick a different bill category.

None of the text is the opinion of Engage. Each bill's description, arguments for, and arguments against are our best effort at describing what each bill does, arguments for, and arguments against the bill. The long description is hidden by design, you can click on it to expand it if you want to read more detail about the bill.  If you believe we are missing something, please contact us with your suggestion. Some of these bills have the notation that they have been sent to the chamber's "kill" committee. This means that the leadership has decided to send the bill to the State committee even though it does not belong there based on its subject matter. This committee, in both chambers, is stacked with members from "safe" districts and the idea is to kill the bill without forcing any less safe members to take a hard vote. It is possible for a bill to survive the kill committee, but it is very rare.

Prime sponsors are given after each bill, with Senate sponsors in () and House sponsors in []. They are color-coded by party.

Each bill has been given a "magnitude" category: Major, Medium, Minor, and Technical. This is a combination of the change the bill would create and the "controversy" level of the bill. Some minor bills that are extending current programs would be major changes if they were introducing something new, but the entire goal here is to allow you to better curate your time. Something uncontroversial likely to pass nearly unanimously that continues a past program may not be worth your time (and please remember, you can still read all of the minor bills!). Technical bills are here to round out the list. They are non-substantive changes.

Senate

Click on the Senate bill title to jump to its section:

MAJOR

MEDIUM

MINOR

HB19-1011 Scope of Manufactured Home Sales Tax Exemption (Tate) [Hooton] TECHNICAL BILL

From Statutory Revision Committee

Short Description:

Fixes the definition of factory built housing in a sales tax bill passed last year. It was pointing to the wrong place in statutes that limited its application.

Long Description: n/a

HB19-1075 Tax Credit Employer-Assisted Housing Pilot Program [Wilson]

Short Description:

Creates a pilot program for employer-assisted housing projects in rural areas. Gives a state income tax credit between 2019 and 2023 for donations made to a sponsor that is solely used for costs of an employer-assisted affordable housing activity in a rural area.  Amount of credit is 20% and limited to $400 in a year. Affordable is defined targeting household with less than 120% of the median income of the area.

Long Description: n/a

Arguments For:

Affordable housing is a crisis in many parts of Colorado, and the ability to find a home near work becomes even more difficult in rural areas. This program tests out the theory that offering this tax incentive for employer-assisted housing will help alleviate this problem in the state’s rural areas. Employer-assisted housing is an increasingly popular way for employers to retain employees, and usually consists of help with rent or mortgage payments. This has the potential to be a win-win-win: a win for employers keeping employees happy and housed near work, a win for employees getting affordable housing, and a win for the state.

Arguments Against:

The amount of this tax credit is not enough to spur the large scale investments required to truly make a dent in affordable housing. Limiting it even further by requiring it goes to employer-assisted housing makes it even less likely to make the difference we need. Finally, limiting it to rural areas ignores the substantial affordable housing crisis we have in non-rural areas of the state. All of these limits adds up to not enough of an impact.

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB19-1075

HB19-1078 Landowner Consent Listing National Register [Lewis]

Short Description:

Requires the state historical society to obtain the approval of each owner of the land and property described prior to making a request to the keeper of the national register of historic places. Right now only a majority is required under federal law.

Long Description: n/a

Arguments For:

The listing of your property on a national, publicly visible database is something every property owner should have veto power over.

Arguments Against:

There are many benefits to being listed, including access to multiple tax credits and codes. Listing does nothing to the owner’s property rights, they are free to sell, alter, or demolish the property. So we should not let the view of one owner potentially derail the desires of the rest.

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB19-1078