These are all of the human services bills proposed in the 2020 session. Each bill has its own bill number, please use your browser search feature to find the bill you are interested in. Return to the Colorado home page to pick a different bill category.

None of the text is the opinion of Engage. Each bill's description, arguments for, and arguments against are our best effort at describing what each bill does, arguments for, and arguments against the bill. The long description is hidden by design, you can click on it to expand it if you want to read more detail about the bill. If you believe we are missing something, please contact us with your suggestion. Some of these bills have the notation that they have been sent to the chamber's "kill" committee. This means that the leadership has decided to send the bill to the State committee even though it does not belong there based on its subject matter. This committee, in both chambers, is stacked with members from "safe" districts and the idea is to kill the bill without forcing any less safe members to take a hard vote. It is possible for a bill to survive the kill committee, but it is very rare.

Prime sponsors are given after each bill, with Senate sponsors in () and House sponsors in []. They are color-coded by party.

Some bills will have text highlighted in pink or highlighted in orange or highlighted in yellow. Pink highlights mean House amendments to the original bill; orange mean Senate amendments; yellow highlights mean conference committee amendments. The bill will say under the header if it has been amended.

Each bill has been given a "magnitude" category: Mega, Major, Medium, Minor, and Technical. This is a combination of the change the bill would create and the "controversy" level of the bill. Some minor bills that are extending current programs would be major changes if they were introducing something new, but the entire goal here is to allow you to better curate your time. Something uncontroversial likely to pass nearly unanimously that continues a past program may not be worth your time (and please remember, you can still read all of the minor bills!). Technical bills are here to round out the list. They are non-substantive changes.

House

Click on the House bill title to jump to its section:

MEGA

MAJOR

MEDIUM

MINOR

HB20-1051 Identification Of Veteran Remains For Proper Military Burial PASSED HOUSE COMMITTEE
HB20-1052 Privacy Protections For Human Services Workers

TECHNICAL

Senate

Click on the Senate bill title to jump to its section:

MEGA

MAJOR

MEDIUM

MINOR

SB20-041 National Guard Parks And Wildlife Benefits

TECHNICAL

HB20-1051 Identification Of Veteran Remains For Proper Military Burial (Scott (R), Crowder (R)) [Rich (R), Duran (D)]

PASSED HOUSE COMMITTEE

Appropriation: None
Fiscal Impact: None

Goal: Allow unclaimed cremated remains of eligible veterans to be buried in federal or state veterans’ cemeteries.

Description:

Requires any cremation facility with unclaimed cremated remains to allow entities recognized by the US veteran’s association and the national personnel records center to inventory any unclaimed cremated remains to identify if any belong to veterans or qualified family members (also eligible for a military burial). If the entity finds anyone qualified to be buried in a state or federal veterans’ cemetery, it must notify the person eligible to take possession of the remains or if that is not known, put a notice in the veteran’s home county newspaper. Individuals have 30 days to claim the remains. If they are not claimed, facilities have 15 days to transfer the remains to a veteran’s cemetery or a veteran’s remains recovery organization.

Additional Information: n/a

Auto-Repeal: None

Arguments For:

We owe our veterans and their qualified family members the full owner of burial in a veterans’ cemetery. Obviously people are free to choose the burial of their choice, but for unclaimed cremated remains, there was no choice made. Far too many of our veterans suffer from their experiences and have difficulty transitioning back into civilian life, which can lead them to difficult lives of isolation. So we will likely find veterans’ remains in these facilities. The burden of the work and cost of burial is on 3rd parties, so this will not cost the state or these facilities anything.

Arguments Against: n/a

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB20-1051

HB20-1052 Privacy Protections For Human Services Workers (Gardner (R), Lee (D)) [Carver (R), Singer (D)]

Appropriation: None
Fiscal Impact: None

Goal: Extend privacy protections for caseworkers working in sensitive cases.

Description:

Expands previous privacy protections for caseworkers working on child abuse and neglect cases to include state and county employees with contact with the public around their duties, which includes attorneys and contractors, engaged in investigation allegations of mistreatment of at-risk adults, establishing, modifying, or enforcing child support orders, and employees of juvenile detention facilities with contact with juveniles.

Additional Information:

Exact privacy protections are: class I misdemeanor to knowingly make the personal information of a state or county employee public on the Internet if the disclosure of the information poses a serious threat to the safety of the employee or their family and the individual disclosing it reasonably should know it would cause a serious threat. These employees can also request that other state or government officials remove personal information from the Internet if they feel their safety is threatened.


Auto-Repeal: None

Arguments For:

It makes sense to extend these protections to employees working on these types of cases. First, we’ve got instances where there is the potential that someone being investigated is capable of violence. Second, instances where a child may be taken away or where child support is involved are highly emotionally charged and more likely to lead to retribution against the state employee.

Arguments Against: n/a

How Should Your Representatives Vote on HB20-1052

SB20-041 National Guard Parks And Wildlife Benefits (Cooke (R)) [Beckman (R)]

Appropriation: None
Fiscal Impact: Not yet know, fiscal note not out yet

Goal: Create a free pass for entrance into state parks for active duty members of the National Guard.

Description:

Creates the Eagle pass, a free annual pass for entrance into state parks for active duty members of the National Guard. There are approximately 3,500 individuals who meet this criteria in the state. The parks and wildlife commission may elect not to issue the pass if it does not receive funding from the general assembly to implement the pass.

Additional Information: n/a

Auto-Repeal: None

Arguments For:

The least we can do for those who have signed up to defend our nation in addition to living a civilian life is to provide them free access to our beautiful state parks. The bill also leaves the general fund the flexibility to fund this or not.

Arguments Against:

We currently provide free access to all state parks in August to all active-duty military members and veterans. This is not only sufficient, it also covers a lot more people.


We should not provide this great perk to just members of the National Guard, all military members should be eligible.

How Should Your Representatives Vote on SB20-041